Texting To Monitor Adherence and Adverse Events in Breast Cancer

Share this content:
In this study, researchers developed a strategy to monitor adherence and AEs in real-time using bidirectional texting via BETA-Text.
In this study, researchers developed a strategy to monitor adherence and AEs in real-time using bidirectional texting via BETA-Text.

A texting system can aid the monitoring of adherence to endocrine therapy and identify adverse events (AEs) among patients with breast cancer, according to a study published in Clinical Cancer Informatics.1

The standard of care for hormone receptor (HR)–positive breast cancer is endocrine therapy for 5 to 10 years, yet up to 40% of women discontinue therapy before 5 years. The reasons for this nonadherence is unknown.

For this study, researchers developed a strategy to monitor adherence and AEs in real-time using bidirectional texting via BETA-Text.

The study enrolled 100 patients with stage I to III HR-positive breast cancer, of whom 89 completed the study. Reasons for not enrolling in the study included lack of interest or competence with text messaging, not wanting a reminder of breast cancer diagnosis, privacy concerns, and other unspecified reasons.

BETA-Text sent 3 types of system-generated texts: daily medication reminders, weekly AE questions, and monthly texts about barriers to adherence. Text responses could generate alerts to the care team if the patient missed doses or experienced a severe AE. Patients who reported AEs via text messaging received an educational message in reply with information to help manage the AE.

Study participants communicated by text messaging for 3 months, and received a mean of 21 texts per week. The response rate to daily text messages was 86.1%. Text messages resulted in 189 alerts about missed doses of endocrine therapy or severe AEs that led to a nurse-initiated telephone call.

The number of office visits (114 vs 101; P = .31) and patient-initiated telephone calls (32 vs 38; P = .82) was similar between study participants and historical controls.

Patients reported that BETA-Text was easy to use and 69% reported that they would like to continue after the study. The majority of patients (73%) stated that it helped them take their medication “very much” or “quite a lot.” 

RELATED: Overall Body Fat Loss Decreases Biomarkers for Breast Cancer Risk

These results suggest that “BETA-Text represents not only an adherence-enhancement tool that can be tested in randomized clinical trials, but also a novel approach to patient engagement and patient-provider communication,” wrote the authors.

Reference

  1. Mougalian SS, Epstein LN, Jhaveri AP, et al. Bidirectional text messaging to monitor endocrine therapy adherence and patient-reported outcomes in breast cancer. Clin Cancer Inform. 2017 May 23. doi: 10.1200/CCI.17.00015 [Epub ahead of print]

Related Resources

You must be a registered member of Cancer Therapy Advisor to post a comment.

Regimen and Drug Listings

GET FULL LISTINGS OF TREATMENT Regimens and Drug INFORMATION

Bone Cancer Regimens Drugs
Brain Cancer Regimens Drugs
Breast Cancer Regimens Drugs
Endocrine Cancer Regimens Drugs
Gastrointestinal Cancer Regimens Drugs
Gynecologic Cancer Regimens Drugs
Head and Neck Cancer Regimens Drugs
Hematologic Cancer Regimens Drugs
Lung Cancer Regimens Drugs
Other Cancers Regimens
Prostate Cancer Regimens Drugs
Rare Cancers Regimens
Renal Cell Carcinoma Regimens Drugs
Skin Cancer Regimens Drugs
Urologic Cancers Regimens Drugs

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters