Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma: current clinical perspectives

Share this content:

the Cancer Therapy Advisor take:

Fibrolamellar carcinoma (FLC) is a rare form of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that accounts for about 1% to 9% of all HCCs.

Although FLC is a type of HCC, it typically affects young adults age 10 to 35 years with no underlying liver disease.

FLC typically presents with vague abdominal pain, nausea, abdominal fullness, malaise, and weight loss. Although physical exam may be within normal limits, patients often present with a palpable abdominal mass or enlarged liver with or without pain in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen.

In regard to diagnosis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the preferred imaging modality because it is helpful in distinguishing FLC from other liver lesions.18

F-FDG positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET/CT) may be useful for diagnosis as well, but further studies of the effectiveness of PET/CT in FLC are warranted.

The mainstay of treatment of FLC is surgical resection as it represents the only potentially curative approach. The ideal treatment is complete surgical resection of the tumor with negative margins in addition to adequate lymph node dissection.

Patients who undergo surgical resection have a 5-year survival rate of 51.6% to 70% compared with 0% among those who do not undergo resection.

On the other hand, FLC is not typically responsive to systemic chemotherapy, but some regimens like GEMOX and FOLFOX have been used with some success.

Fluorouracil combined with recombinant interferon alpha-2b may also be beneficial. Locoregional therapies such as radiation therapy have been considered for FLC as well.

Fibrolamellar carcinoma (FLC) is a variant of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which comprises ∼1%–9% of all HCCs.
Fibrolamellar carcinoma (FLC) is a variant of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which comprises ∼1%–9% of all HCCs.

Abstract: Fibrolamellar carcinoma (FLC) is a variant of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which comprises ∼1%–9% of all HCCs.

Although FLC is a variant of HCC, it is distinct from HCC in that it most often affects younger patients (10–35 years of age) with no underlying liver disease. FLC often presents with vague abdominal pain, nausea, abdominal fullness, malaise, and weight loss.

Surgery is the current mainstay of treatment for FLC and remains the only potentially curative option. While FLCs are considered less responsive to chemotherapy than their classic HCC counterparts, there have been suggestions that multimodality treatments may be effective, especially in advanced cases.

Further research is necessary to determine effective systemic therapies as an adjunct to surgery for FLC

Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, fibrolamellar, hepatocyte paraffin I, locoregional therapy

Page 1 of 8

Related Resources

You must be a registered member of Cancer Therapy Advisor to post a comment.

Regimen and Drug Listings

GET FULL LISTINGS OF TREATMENT Regimens and Drug INFORMATION

Bone Cancer Regimens Drugs
Brain Cancer Regimens Drugs
Breast Cancer Regimens Drugs
Endocrine Cancer Regimens Drugs
Gastrointestinal Cancer Regimens Drugs
Gynecologic Cancer Regimens Drugs
Head and Neck Cancer Regimens Drugs
Hematologic Cancer Regimens Drugs
Lung Cancer Regimens Drugs
Other Cancers Regimens
Prostate Cancer Regimens Drugs
Rare Cancers Regimens
Renal Cell Carcinoma Regimens Drugs
Skin Cancer Regimens Drugs
Urologic Cancers Regimens Drugs

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters