Adding Bevacizumab to Standard Chemotherapy in Extensive-disease SCLC

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Adding bevacizumab to both for the first-line treatment of extensive-disease small cell lung cancer improved progression-free survival, but not overall survival.
Adding bevacizumab to both for the first-line treatment of extensive-disease small cell lung cancer improved progression-free survival, but not overall survival.

Compared with cisplatin and etoposide alone, adding bevacizumab to both for the first-line treatment of extensive-disease small cell lung cancer (SCLC) improved progression-free survival, but not overall survival, according to the results of a phase 3 trial published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.1

In this phase 3 trial, researchers randomly assigned 204 patients with treatment-naive disease to cisplatin plus etoposide with (101 patients) or without (103 patients) bevacizumab for a maximum of 6 courses. Patients assigned to bevacizumab who did not progress could continue treatment until disease progression or a maximum of 18 courses. The primary endpoint was overall survival.

With a median follow-up of 34.9 months, the median progression-free survival was 6.7 months for patients assigned bevacizumab compared with 5.7 months for patients assigned cisplatin/etoposide alone (P = .030).

No significant differences in overall survival were found. The median overall survival for patients assigned bevacizumab was 9.8 months compared with 8.9 months for patients assigned cisplatin/etoposide alone (P = .113).

The study was designed to show a survival improvement at 1 year from 40% to 58%. One-year survival rates for patients assigned bevacizumab was 37%.

The researchers concluded that combining bevacizumab with standard platinum plus etoposide chemotherapy does not result in significant overall survival improvements for patients with extensive-disease SCLC.

Compared with cisplatin and etoposide alone, adding bevacizumab to both for the first-line treatment of extensive-disease small cell lung cancer (SCLC) improved progression-free survival, but not overall survival, according to the results of a phase 3 trial published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.1

In this phase 3 trial, researchers randomly assigned 204 patients with treatment-naive disease to cisplatin plus etoposide with (101 patients) or without (103 patients) bevacizumab for a maximum of 6 courses. Patients assigned to bevacizumab who did not progress could continue treatment until disease progression or a maximum of 18 courses. The primary endpoint was overall survival.

With a median follow-up of 34.9 months, the median progression-free survival was 6.7 months for patients assigned bevacizumab compared with 5.7 months for patients assigned cisplatin/etoposide alone (P = .030).

No significant differences in overall survival were found. The median overall survival for patients assigned bevacizumab was 9.8 months compared with 8.9 months for patients assigned cisplatin/etoposide alone (P = .113).

The study was designed to show a survival improvement at 1 year from 40% to 58%. One-year survival rates for patients assigned bevacizumab was 37%.

RELATED: Paraneoplastic Syndromes in Lung Cancer: SIADH

The researchers concluded that combining bevacizumab with standard platinum plus etoposide chemotherapy does not result in significant overall survival improvements for patients with extensive-disease SCLC.

Reference

  1. Tiseo M, Boni L, Ambrosio F, et al. Italian, multicenter, phase III, randomized study of cisplatin plus etoposide with or without bevacizumab as first-line treatment in extensive-disease small-cell lung cancer: The GOIRC-AIFA FARM6PMFMFJM Trial. 2017 Jan 30. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2016.69.4844 [Epub ahead of print]

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