Internalization: Acute apoptosis of breast cancer cells using herceptin-immobilized gold nanoparticles

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the Cancer Therapy Advisor take:

Gold nanoparticles have been of interest to researchers for their use in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer for nearly 10 years.

For researchers, a large part of their interest lies in the ability to use gold nanoparticles in thermal imaging, scattering analysis, catalysis, photoelectronic devices, and biomedical diagnostics.

Recently, researchers were able to successfully immobilize herceptin on gold nanoparticles to improve the precision of interaction with breast cancer cells. Gold nanoparticles increased their mean size by 53 nm (from 29 nm to 82 nm) after herceptin was immobilized.

By conducting this in vitro cell culture experiment, researchers found that while breast cancer cells died in the presence of herceptin-conjugated gold nanoparticles, human skin cells were well proliferated.

Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to better understand the cell death and the relationship between breast cancer cells and gold nanoparticles.

From there the researchers determined that herceptin-conjugated gold nanoparticles bound directly to the breast cancer cell membrane, resulting in saturation after 6 hours of incubation.

This research indicates that the progression signal of breast cancer cells is slowed by the precise binding of antibody to the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 receptor of the breast cancer cell membrane, which causes cell death.

Gold nanoparticles offer important new possibilities in cancer diagnosis and therapy.
Gold nanoparticles offer important new possibilities in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

Abstract: Herceptin, the monoclonal antibody, was successfully immobilized on gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to improve their precise interactions with breast cancer cells (SK-BR3).

The mean size of the GNPs (29 nm), as determined by dynamic light scattering, enlarged to 82 nm after herceptin immobilization.

The in vitro cell culture experiment indicated that human skin cells (FB) proliferated well in the presence of herceptin-conjugated GNP (GNP–Her), while most of the breast cancer cells (SK-BR3) had died. To elucidate the mechanism of cell death, the interaction of breast cancer cells with GNP–Her was tracked by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

Consequently, GNP–Her was found to be bound precisely to the membrane of the breast cancer cell, which became almost saturated after 6 hours incubation.

This shows that the progression signal of SK-BR3 cells is retarded completely by the precise binding of antibody to the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 receptor of the breast cancer cell membrane, causing cell death.

Keywords: herceptin, gold nanoparticles, SK-BR3 cells, intracellular uptake

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