Intense tumor lymphocyctic infiltration (TLI) was found to be a favorable prognostic marker for survival in patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer.1

For the study, investigators sought to determine the prognostic value of TLI in patients with lung cancer. Primary endpoint was overall survival and secondary end points were disease-free survival (DFS) and specific DFS.

A total of 824 patients were included in the discovery set and 984 were included in the validation set of the study.  Complete data was obtained for 783 patients (409 deaths) and 763 (344 deaths), respectively. TLI was defined as either intense or non-intense. Median follow-up was performed at 4.8 years and 6.0 years, respectively.

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TLI was intense in 11% of patients in the discovery set and 6% in the validation set (P < .001). TLI’s prognostic value in the discovery set was confirmed in the validation set (overall survival HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.38 – 0.81; P = .002; DFS HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.42 – 0.83; P = .002; specific DFS HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.38 – 0.82; P = .003 vs overall survival HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23 – 0.85; P = .01; DFS HR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.24 – 0.78; P = .005; specific DFS HR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.22 – 0.80; P = .008, respectively).

Reference

  1. Brambilla E, Le Teuff G, Marguet S, et al. Prognostic effect of tumor lymphocytic infiltration in resectable non-small cell lung cancer [published online ahead of print February 1, 2016]. J Clin Oncol. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2015.63.0970.