(HealthDay News) — For adults with nonmetastatic soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities or superficial trunk, a moderately hypofractionated, shorter regimen of radiotherapy is safe, according to a study published in The Lancet Oncology.

Researchers examined the safety of a moderately hypofractionated, shorter regimen of radiotherapy in a phase 2 trial involving adults with nonmetastatic soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities or superficial trunk and an ECOG performance status of 0 to 3. Preoperative radiotherapy was administered at a dose of 42.75 Gy in 15 fractions of 2.85 Gy/day for 3 weeks in 120 patients.

The researchers found that 31% of patients developed a major wound complication at a median of 37 days after surgery. None of the patients had grade 3 or higher acute radiation toxicity (during radiotherapy or within 4 weeks after radiotherapy) or an on-treatment serious adverse event.


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Late radiation toxicity (at least 6 months after surgery) of grade 3 or higher occurred in 4 of 115 patients: 2 femur fractures, 1 lymphedema, and 1 skin ulceration. There were no treatment-related deaths.

“Although data are still maturing, this preoperative radiotherapy regimen offers a reasonable alternative to conventional fractionation, especially if it facilitates care at a high-volume sarcoma center or alleviates resource constraints that might interfere with the completion of five weeks of radiotherapy,” the authors wrote.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the biopharmaceutical industry.

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