The following article features coverage from the Society of Gynecologic Oncology’s 50th Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer. Click here to read more of Cancer Therapy Advisor‘s conference coverage.

Results from a prospective cohort study of young Japanese women showed that vaccination against human papilloma virus (HPV) infection influenced the prevalence of type-specific HPV infection. These results were reported at the Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO)’s 50th Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer.

In this study, HPV screening and type-specific HPV testing were performed on 2493 Pap test specimens collected from Japanese women aged 20 to 21 years during the period covering 2014 to 2017. Study participants provided HPV immunization history through completion of a questionnaire. HPV type-specific infection in different birth cohorts, 1993 to 1994 (prior to organized HPV immunization in the 12-16 year age group) and 1994 to 1997 (following organized HPV immunization in the 12-16 year age group) was determined.

Related Articles

For the years 2014 to 2017, HPV vaccination rates were 28.6%, 74.8%, 76.7%, and 80.0%, respectively (P <.01). The prevalence of HPV-16/-18 infection was 1.3% in 2014, 0.5% in 2015, 0.4% in 2016, and 0% in 2017 (P =.02).  In 2014, the most prevalent strains were HPV-52, HPV-16, and HPV-56. HPV-52, HPV-51, and HPV-58 were most prevalent in 2017.

Read more of Cancer Therapy Advisor‘s coverage of SGO’s annual meeting by visiting the conference page.

Reference

  1. Sekine M, Yamaguchi M, Kudo R, et al. Epidemiologic profile of type specific human papillomavirus (HPV) infection after initiation of HPV vaccination in Japanese girls. Presented at: Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO)’s 50th Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer; Honolulu, Hawaii; March 16-19, 2019. Abstract 12.