Conclusion

Patients may be directed to receive their infused therapy from a physician’s office or infusion center rather than a hospital outpatient clinic due to a cost differential. Studies demonstrate that costs are substantially higher when infusions are delivered in a hospital outpatient setting, with no difference in quality of care.

References

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