NANETS: Diarrhea Impacts Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors

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Diarrhea is associated with worse health-related quality of life in patients with NET symptoms.
Diarrhea is associated with worse health-related quality of life in patients with NET symptoms.

Diarrhea is associated with worse health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with neuroendocrine tumor (NET) symptoms, reported authors of a study (NET Abstract #C3) presented at the 7th NET conference in Nashville, TN. The meeting was organized by the North American Neuroendocrine Tumors Society (NANETS).

“In this cross-sectional study, HRQL was negatively impacted by diarrhea,” said lead study author Jennifer L. Beaumont, MS, of the Department of Medical Social Sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, IL, and colleagues.

Of 637 patients with neuroendocrine tumors who participated in an online anonymous survey, 149 (23%) had not received any treatment in the past month, the coauthors reported.

“Patients with 4 or more bowel movements per day reported HRQL scores worse than the general population, although those who were not treated reported better physical functioning scores than treated patients” (P=0.02), they reported

“Longitudinal reports of HRQL are needed to evaluate the HRQL impact of symptom improvement,” they stated.

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