Cytoreductive Nephrectomy Predicts Survival Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (mRCC)

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Cytoreductive nephrectormy (CN) is a partial kidney removal surgery. According to a study published in Clinical Genitourinary Cancer, patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and synchronous metastases with sunitinib as their first-line treatment can predict survival through CN.

 

In a multivariate analysis, researchers found that there is a 50% reduction in risk of death for patients who underwent CN in comparison to patients who have foregone the surgery. In the sample of 186 metastatic RCC patients, 81% of the patients who underwent CN had a better Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, were younger, and survived significantly longer than their counterparts who did not undergo CN.

 

At a median follow-up of 34 months, survival was 24 months for patients who underwent CN and 9 months for patients who did not. Using an exploratory stratified analysis, researchers tried finding specific subgroups of patients who may benefit from CN, but there were no significant interactions found.

 

These results solidified CN’s independent significance, and CN presents another option for patients with synchronous metastases from RCC that have undergone any VEGF-targeted therapy.

 

Aristotle Bamias and colleagues said CN’s precise role still needs to be clarified through randomized clinical trials.

Cytoreductive Nephrectomy Predicts Survival Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (mRCC)
Cytoreductive nephrectomy predicts improved survival among patients with mRCC.

Cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN) predicts improved survival among patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and synchronous metastases who have received first-line treatment with sunitinib, indicate study findings.

Not only did patients who underwent CN have an approximate 50% reduction in the risk of death compared with their counterparts who did not undergo the procedure, CN remained significantly independently predictive of prolonged survival in multivariate analysis.

However, Aristotle Bamias (University of Athens, Greece) and colleagues warn that the exact role of CN and the best method for selecting subgroups of patients most likely to gain a survival benefit still need to be clarified by the results of ongoing randomised clinical trials.

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