Ewing Sarcoma - Cancer Therapy Advisor

Ewing Sarcoma

Slideshow

  • Colored x-rays of the forearm (frontal on left; profile on right) highlighting the Ewing sarcoma cancerous area (thick orange region) of radius.

    Colored X-rays of the Forearm

    Colored x-rays of the forearm (frontal on left; profile on right) highlighting the Ewing sarcoma cancerous area (thick orange region) of radius.

  • Colored X-ray of the forearm showing Ewing sarcoma (light yellow area) in the upper center of the radius.

    Ewing Sarcoma in the Radius

    Colored X-ray of the forearm showing Ewing sarcoma (light yellow area) in the upper center of the radius.

  • A frontal view X-ray of the thorax highlighting the Ewing sarcoma on the right.

    X-ray of the Thorax

    A frontal view X-ray of the thorax highlighting the Ewing sarcoma on the right.

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  • MRI of Pelvis

    MRI of Pelvis

    MRI scan of the pelvis depicting Ewing sarcoma (white oval mass just left of the center) that is growing into the bladder space.

  • Horizontal section of the pelvic MRI scan in slide #4. The tumor began in the right pelvic bone.

    Horizontal View of Pelvic MRI Scan

    Horizontal section of the pelvic MRI scan in slide #4. The tumor began in the right pelvic bone.

  • Histology slide of Ewing sarcoma in the femur.

    Histology

    Histology slide of Ewing sarcoma in the femur.

Ewing sarcoma is one of a group of cancers known collectively as the Ewing sarcoma family of tumors. Despite the fact that Ewing sarcoma is a rare form of bone cancer, it is highly malignant and commonly occurs in children between the ages of 10 and 15 years and young adults. The annual incidence is 3 in 1 million in children under age 15 years.

Typically, it affects large bones such as the femur, tibia, humerus, and pelvic bones, and is known to spread to other parts of the body at an early age. At diagnosis, 30% of patients present with metastases to the lungs, bone, or bone marrow. Ewing sarcoma is caused by chromosomal changes that occur after birth, and often has a dismal outcome. For patients with localized Ewing sarcoma, the 5-year overall survival is 70%, but this rate has not changed in the past 10 years. Fortunately, increasing knowledge of its biology is bringing new hope for improved treatments.

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